Am I Covered Under Workers’ Comp? | Bloom Law Office, West New York
19403
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-19403,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-16.9,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.5.5,vc_responsive

Am I Covered Under Workers’ Comp?

Am I Covered Under Workers’ Comp? | Bloom Law Office, West New York

Am I Covered Under Workers’ Comp?

The majority of jobs around the country require that your employer pay workers’ compensation insurance for you, but there are always exceptions. If you’ve been hurt on the job, or related to the job, Bloom Law Office specializes in workers’ comp claims, and they don’t get paid until you do. The best way to tell if your employer has workers’ comp for you is to look at your pay stub. However, if you don’t get a pay stub or if the stub is confusing, it’s important to ask your employer or HR representative, so you’re prepared in case of an injury.

The In’s and Out’s of Workers’ Comp Coverage

If you own a business, are a sole proprietor, or a partner in a business, you probably already know that you’re not covered by workers’ compensation insurance. In some cases, a business owner might legally be able to purchase workers’ compensation coverage for themselves, but they will also be paying standard premiums (which can be quite high for an individual).

Technically, federal employees, longshoremen, and railroad employees aren’t covered by workers’ comp, but that’s because they have their own similar benefits. For instance, federal employees are covered under the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act or FECA. Railroad workers are protected by the Railroad Workers Act, and the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act protects longshoremen.

Independent contractors do not have workers’ compensation coverage, just like they aren’t covered by the health plan of their client. This is one of the reasons independent contractors are usually paid at a higher rate than employees. It’s a trade-off because the client isn’t required to offer any benefits beyond a salary or agreed-upon rate.

Contact Bloom Law Office Today!

Additional exceptions include part-time domestic workers (i.e., housecleaners and nannies), taxi drivers in many cases, part-time maintenance workers such as gardeners, and intermittent workers. However, in some cases, these exceptions are covered under workers’ comp and are addressed individually when employment is offered. If you’ve been hurt on the job, and want to know more about workers’ comp insurance, contact Bloom Law Office today – 855-208-3650.